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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the government, the current effort in afghanistan and condition of the u.s. economy, all referenced in the president's speech. here is how you can talk to us the first half hour. president obama saying last night it is time to turn the page. your interpretation of that. phone, e-mail, or twitter. again, if you want to give an e- mail, journal@c-span.org and twitter, go to twitter and then c-spanwj. "the washington post" use is that " for its story tonight. turning to "the new york times." and going to "usa today" -- again, the president quote. conn. mary on hours democrats line. caller: good morning, pedro. i wanted to say how proud i am of president obama fulfilling another of his campaign commitments. i wish to the iraqi people well in governing themselves. and i agree with the president that it is time that we concentrates on our economy and what happened to the people in the middle class. i hope he does stand strong on inundating -- eliminating the tax credit that was given to the very wealthy, by discontinuing that at the end of the year. host: raleigh, north carolina. john, re
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
this morning is what is america's core competency in your mind. if you would like to tell us how that can be nurtured by our leaders, we would like to hear that as well where we are going to get to your calls right away if we can get our producers to get some calls on the line while we are talking to you about america's core competency. we went to wikipedia which, as you know, is the self edited by people all rumble world really -- all are around the world really. we want to give you some statistics about the united states for its land mass. over 3.79 million square miles. 300 million people. the united states is the third or fourth largest country by a total area and the third largest both by land area of population. it is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multi- cultural nations, the product of a large-scale immigration from many countries. the u.s. economy is the world's largest national gdp of $14.30 trillion and a quarter of the nominal global gdp and one-fifth of the gdp at purchasing power parity. that is the size and the economics of the united states. one of the poss
of manhattan and brooklyn and you can see pictures of this in front of us. into this toxic crowd ran firefighters and police and other first responders. first responders came from all 50 states to aid in the rescue and cleanup of the subsequent days. the environmental protection administration, e.p.a., despite ample evidence to the contrary kept falsely proclaiming that the air was safe to breathe. it wasn't. the terrorists caused environmental catastrophe but the federal government compounded the damage by telling people the environment was safe when it wasn't and now thousands of people are sick and in need of special care. we have a moral obligation to treat those who became ill and that's what this bill is all about. for eight years representative maloney and i supported a bipartisan basis by the new york delegation and others have worked to bring this bill to the floor. now it is finally time to pass it. time and again, as we move this bill through the legislative process, we've adjusted it, reduced its size and scope, limited its cost and made concessions to broaden the coaliti
to know more than enbridge what has caused this incident. we do strive for 0 incidents. this concerns us and we take it very seriously. >> the longer term clean-up still needs to be investigated, the impact to ground water, how far it's gone into the soil, that kind of thing. >> reporter: what needs no investigation, whether this spill will hit chicago drivers in the wallet. it's happening already. depending on where you fill your tank, gas prices are already up between 15 and 20 cents a gallon, with room to go even higher. if you think it's no big deal, just talk to a chicago cabby. >> it become very scary for us. >> reporter: it's likely to get scarier still, unless another way can be found to provide oil normally carried by this pipeline, or to get this fixed fast and the crude flowing again. >> bottom line, this is a big deal, especially for the chicago area, because this pipeline feeds four of the major refineries that produce gasoline around this area. >> reporter: and because of this spill, analysts say gasoline prices in the chicago land area are going up, while the rest of the n
. >>> officials with the rta predict it will cost you more to use public transportation next year. the rta says there will nobody major expansion of chicago's transit system for many years. and fare increases will be necessary to keep existing system running. the red line expansion and metro line improvements are on hold. the state owes the rta $300 million this year. so in an agreement to free spare is to years is void unless funding comes through. >>> mayor daley must submit a new city budget plan next month. tonight he will host the last of three public hearings on that budget. the city faces a deficit of more than $600 million. the mayor plans to take suggestions and questions tonight at 7:00 p.m. at the north grand high school gymnasium that's at 4338 west avenue. >>> the bear's say there is one pro-- the mayor's wife say there is one program that will remain. maggie daley celebrating 20 years of her program after school matters. it helps chicago children by teaching them job skills and introducing them to the arts. as for her husband's decision to retire from city hall, maggie daley says
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
us to the edge with wall street. i keep saying to voters that they need to keep pushing and keep the democrats in their. keep pushing, folks. host: you can join the conversation online, the twittered page is twitter.com/c- spanwj. or you can send us an e-mail and journal@c-span.org. we welcome our listeners that listen to was on radio. this is from the weekend edition of "the wall street journal." host: one final point from her -- "what is the mainstream media getting wrong in getting right? of the media does not appreciate how livid people are with washington." host: by the way, new polls are showing barbara boxer ahead in california. matt dillon says from arlington, texas, good morning, welcome to "washington journal." caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to comment on how the movement that the tea party has, gosh, we are just tired all the losses and misplaced promises that the people always seem to give us. we had a grassroots movement for everyone. republicans, democrats, and tea party yeariers. this new financial reform bill has nothing to do with that, they
third parties and subsequently use in your operations? >> we've put in a full array of testing. we're taking samples from every incoming load. we've talked to all of our vendors for them also to do testing. we're doing a composite on these loads weekly and send them in for testing. we're going to do a monthly swabbing of our feed mill. we are currently in the process of completely cleaning and disinfecting the entire mill from top to bottom. and we've done extensive employee training to make sure that the mill is kept tightened up so that there's no open hatches as noted in the 483. >> what steps do you take to ensure that those planned or announced safeguards are implemented? >> we have a daily inspection by the mill manager. then we have an outside supervisor who is going to inspect the facilities once a week and give me a full report. >> do you still have your hog operations? >> we own some hog facilities but we don't own any -- we don't operate hog facilities. we just lease them. >> i see. mr. chairman, i note with some distress my time is up, and i thank you for your courtesy.
freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o., 8% of the service members let go under don't ask, don't tell held critical occupations defined as services such as interpreters, 3% had skills in an important foreign language such as arabic, farsi or korean. more than 13,000 troops have been dismissed from the military simply because of their sexual orientation since president clton signed this law in 1993. mr. president, soci
're document, and engaging in a discussion. here are the phone numbers. if you are a democrat, join us. rep conditions, join us, and independents, join us. good morning once again, this is the kind of discussion i can promise you would only happen on c-span. 34 years ago we used to call us the place where the constitution came to live every day, because it gave you a running example of the three branches of government and the live coverage of the congress, executive branch and what we told you about the supreme court so we couldn't let constitution day go by without a discussion. seems like we're hearing more and more about it these days, and on the front page of the washington times in a story about constitution day, david eisner who runs the national constitution center in philadelphia explains why. here is the story. he writes -- the tea party has got people thinking more seriously about what's in the constitution and what's not. that's the quote from the political analyst with american enterprise institute but they say it would be wrong to assume tea party movement was -- >> supreme cou
afternoon, i'm steve sanders. >> i'm allison payne. we welcome our viewers who are watching us around the country on wgn america. wgn's julian crews is live at police headquarters with more on the march. julian? >> reporter: good afternoon. the protest just ended a short while ago having lasted less than two hours. now mayor richard m. daley is on the record supporting his police superintendent, but the mayor's recent decision to step aside leaves jody weis in limbo with his contract set to expire in a growing number of people clamoring for his resignation. >> some people better rise up to the occasion and start talking to mayor daley and say, listen what we are doing is not working. >> this isn't good for us and not for the citizens of chicago. >> we need to begin the search now for the new superintendent. this superintendent's contract is up on february 1. we shouldn't be wasting time until the last moment. >> harsh word for a vulnerable jody weis. embattled police superintendent is hearing it from all sides from chicago aldermen urging him to resign and from rank and file patrolmen
of a possible o copycat attack. she's with us in the studio early this friday morning, she's with us in the studio early this friday morning, september 17th, 2010. captioning funded by cbs >>> good friday morning to you. still waking up there, i'm erica hill. good to have you with us. fog not guilty new york city. >> and right there, too. i'm harry smith. good morning, everybody. breaking news this morning, you'll never guess who showed up in a prison in peru. it was beth hole way trying to vis visit joran van der sleuth, face to face for about five minutes. >> of course natalie hole way's mom who disappeared in rememberu. >>> also people in new york talking about this not only people in new york affected but really unusual in the city yesterday. huge storms rolled through around rush hour. hail, powerful winds, there was a huge thunderstorm. sideways rains and a possible tornado. dave price joins us this morning in queens in forest hills, new york where the storm hit hardest with the latest this morning. talk about destruction, dave. >> you know, typically when weather like this hap
-- they should have enough capital to cover all of their losses. host: ok, thank you. republican line. calling us from los angeles, at an early hour. caller: i wanted to comment. i don't think the government should help any firm, and there are no firms that are too large to fail. there are perfect bankruptcy laws that are printed on the books. we just have to let the strongest firms survive and those of that for some reason cannot maintain their costs, you have to let them go. we cannot interfere with our market system. host: thank you for your call. i mentioned about candidates. some candidates picking up on this theme. here is just one example. cathy rodgers, washington's fifth congressional district. on her website, she has a series of pledges should see is putting forward. no. 5, reversed the wall street bailout. saying she had voted against the $700 billion tarp the bill and now our goal should be to make sure something like tarp never happens again. no company is too big to fail. the only thing to big to fail as america itself. one candidate picking up on this theme of bailouts. let us go n
you so much for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the house of representatives live next. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. today the house is working hard to get out of here, we do not know the schedule will change, but we for sure know that one of the bills on their agenda today is a discussion about compensation for 9/11 first responders who have developed health problems. thank you for being with us. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] periods [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend scott moore, doctorial student, germany. the chaplain: god of the nations, you have chosen many in various ways to show your pre
minutes november? if you want to weigh in via e-mail as well, you can do so. and if you want to use twitter. again, we take our focus for the 45 minutes for the front page story in the "wall street journal" this morning. taking a look at political story with speaker pelosi. this is out of washington. they write so it talks about the political journey that will take, the paper talks more about that. but for our 45 minutes we're using this as a springboard to hear from democrats only. we'll take e-mail and twitter affouf this question, too. one more section from the interior pages of the same story. the writers write this morning. so the numbers will be on your screen. to your calls looking at speaker pelosi this november. portland, yorle, on -- oregon, on our line who thinks she will help. caller: i think nancy pelosi has been consistent and correct in her political decisions. i think she is definitely good for the country. and we small -- small african american community are very strong supporters. i think that the media is kind of hyped up all the predictions about shrinking democr
nearby. >>> we welcome our viewers who are watching us around the country on wgn america. wgn's robert jordan is live in evanston with the top story today. >> reporter: thank you. this all began with an explosion at about 3:56 this morning in evanston. the police descended on the park here near the nichols school. they were unable to pinpoint the location of that explosion. but a person who was in the area was out walking his dog. he says he is not usually up that early in the morning. but the dog woke him and that's with a caused him to get up and take him out at that time. >> my dog woke me up. maybe a little before 4:00 this morning. loud boom. shook the windows and everything. >> reporter: the explosion jarred the sleeping neighborhood around 4:00 in the morning. almost an hour later dale wyatt was walking his dog buddha in the park near nichols school. then the dog began to pull at his leash. >> and i thought he was chasing a rabbit because he was determined and we got about 15 feet away and i could smell but like something. and i got closer and honestly i thought it was a mannequ
. this is a mexican landfall in this storm and it's a u.s. problem. we'll show you pictures of galveston this morning, of the waves breaking in that area. all the way up the texas coast. well into texas, with the problems that will be texas flooding. here's a look at the rain. look at the yellow, the heaviest rain. and the center of circulation is west of corpus christi. there has been a big move on the storm toward the north. let's show you why it's not going to go away quickly. four to eight inches of rain. from laredo to corpus christi. austin, a little south of dallas as well. big-time texas flooding. watch hermine interact with this stalled front that's north. look at oklahoma, north texas, in the hill country here. we could have a good, solid of 10, 12 inches of rain that just stays put. nothing is going to kick this out until about thursday. we'll go over all the weather patterns. and again, watching the tropics, active. there's a little wave off the coast of africa. gaston has weakened. not a lot to talk about. we'll watch them all. george? >>> we're going to go now to the wildfires in colora
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, www.jtc.gov. the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
thing that caused us to do it. just a deep conviction from god that something has to happen. >> reporter: so he is praying. as are so many other people around the world. i'm terry moran in gainesville, florida. >> now more information's starting to come out about this guy. they said apparently he doesn't know any muslims personally and a lot of what he knows about the religion has come from youtube. a lot of question about who this guy is. >> countering extremism with extremism is what a lot of people are saying. it's interesting. in 2005 there was just a report out that some guards at guantanamo bay flushed a koran, and that incited deadly riots in afghanistan. when you later general david petraeus saying this could really hurt our armed men overseas, it is a worry. >>> coming up after the break, the results of a study on memory loss. >> who is osked more, men or women? you're watching "world n >>> in a new study that proves what women and myself have really known for years, that men are more forgetful. >> not surprised here. the study from the mayo clinic says as men age they are much
, this has helped us a lot combat the production. we formed in east tennessee, what was the southeast tennessee meth task force which was a local, state and federal partnership because methamphetamine production can't be combat the exclusively at the state and local level. they just simply can't. they didn't have the resources to surveil it. it becomes a toxic site where it is made, so they didn't have the resources to clean it up. and it grew to be the east tennessee meth task force and now it is a statewide task force. we have had tremendous success. but we have to continue to modernize the laws, including federal component in order for drug professionals to be able to keep it out of the hands of people who are addicted, because they produce this, most of the time, for use. and as a result, this is just a deadly, deadly disease out in the hinterland of america and we have to fight it. this bill is another step in the right direction. congressman gordon and i worked together and congressman cooper passed a bill a few years ago to create federal grant support of the children who are t
thank you all for putting a face to something that many of us really had no idea was happening in america. well, the beauty of all this is that you're not your past. you get to create from now who you want to be. and you can use your past as a way to strengthen who you want to be. so thank you for sharing your stories. and again, i want to say to everybody, if you think something strange is going on, in your house, in your neighborhood, especially when children are involved, you need to tell somebody. listen to that part of yourself that these girls listened to. and don't stop until you feel you've been heard. thank you all for watching. and remember, make your car a no phone zone. you thought i wasn't going to get it in, but i did. bye, everybody. bye, everybody. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] how would i make school a tter place? field trips to the zoo! more basketballs. soccer balls. and a museum! [ growls ] more basketballs. soccer balls! more books. yeah. like just a ton of books. [ g
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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